manifest05:

The Jameh Masjid (Friday Mosque) of Jondishapour University in Ahvaz, Iran by Kamran Diba, 1977. The layering of walls and voids allows the prayer hall to be separated from the intrusions of daily life. The gradient of the roof is designed to emphasize the Qibla, the mosque’s orientation towards the Kaaba in Mecca. In addition, small skylights were made to allow beams of light to penetrate the darkness and add a holy aura to the mysterious space. The overall purpose of the design was to take basic concepts of Islamic architecture and adapt it to minimalism creating a unique context to form this example of Post-Modernism. 

(via reverendandroid)

whateveramusesme:

A Product From the First Atomic Blast
Trinitite, also known as atomsite or Alamogordo glass, is the glassy residue left on the desert floor after the plutonium-based Trinity nuclear bomb test on July 16, 1945, near Alamogordo, New Mexico. The glass is primarily composed of arkosic sand composed of quartz grains and feldspar (both microcline and smaller amount of plagioclase with small amount of calcite, hornblende and augite in a matrix of sandy clay) that was melted by the atomic blast. It is usually a light green, although color can vary. It is mildly radioactive, but is safe to handle.

whateveramusesme:

A Product From the First Atomic Blast

Trinitite, also known as atomsite or Alamogordo glass, is the glassy residue left on the desert floor after the plutonium-based Trinity nuclear bomb test on July 16, 1945, near Alamogordo, New Mexico. The glass is primarily composed of arkosic sand composed of quartz grains and feldspar (both microcline and smaller amount of plagioclase with small amount of calcite, hornblende and augite in a matrix of sandy clay) that was melted by the atomic blast. It is usually a light green, although color can vary. It is mildly radioactive, but is safe to handle.